Chartres Cathedral; Joseph, Judith (Sibyl), Jesus Son of Sirach; right embrasure, right portal, north transept.
 
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Title:Chartres Cathedral; Joseph, Judith (Sibyl), Jesus Son of Sirach; right embrasure, right portal, north transept
Notes:Detail of bases (from left) of figures of Joseph, a Sibyl (?) or Judith (?), and Jesus Son of Sirach (right jamb, Old Testament portal, north transept). Joseph's socle represents a woman being enticed by a dragon; she may be Potiphar's wife and/or Israel listening to foreign gods (Jeremiah 3). If the central figure is Judith, the dog socle represents the young widow's faithfulness to her husband. Jesus Son of Sirach's socle of a workman on the Temple is the result of his being confused with Jeshua (Ezra 3), who rebuilt the Temple after the exile. [NW]

Digitized from the slide collection of James T. Womack, Nashville, TN.

Date:1204-1210
Building:Cathédrale de Chartres
City/Town:Chartres
Country:France

General Subject:Dog
Dragons
Temple
Library of Congress Subject:Christian art and symbolism -- France -- Chartres -- Medieval, 500-1500
ICONCLASS Number:11I62(JOSEPH)
46AA1262
11I62(JESUS SIRACH)
Index of Christian Art Number:20 C48 CND 14N,001

Permalink: http://diglib.library.vanderbilt.edu/act-imagelink.pl?RC=26380
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Copyright Permission:Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike - CC-BY-SA-3.0
Attribution:Chartres Cathedral; Joseph, Judith (Sibyl), Jesus Son of Sirach; right embrasure, right portal, north transept, from Art in the Christian Tradition, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library, Nashville, TN. http://diglib.library.vanderbilt.edu/act-imagelink.pl?RC=26380 [retrieved November 27, 2020].
Record Number:26380 Last Updated: 2020-10-29 08:51:21 Record Created: 2002-03-21 00:00:00
Institution:Vanderbilt University Unit: Collection: Art in the Christian Tradition