Alpha and Omega.
 
Click to enter image viewer

Use the Save buttons below to save any of the available image sizes to your computer.
Download Thumbnail image:
Download Medium image:
Download Large image:
Title:Alpha and Omega
Notes:"It is done! I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. To the thirsty I will give water as a gift from the spring of the water of life." This ironwork symbol created by an artist in 1960 as part of the exterior decoration of Benton Chapel at Vanderbilt University, offers a multi-layered vision of the twenty-first first chapter of Revelation. The letters that stand as the beginning and end of the Greek alphabet are prominent, supported by a cross and circle that represent Christ's universal nature. On the four sides are single wavy strands that recall the water of life, surrounding the world.
Date:1960
Building:Vanderbilt University. Divinity School
Object/Function:Metalwork
Material:Metal
City/Town:Nashville
State:TN
Country:United States

Lectionary links:BRegn
CEast07
CEast05
CEast02
BAllS
ANYDy
BNYDy
CNYDy
General Subject:Alpha and omega
ICONCLASS Number:11C16
11D111

Permalink: http://diglib.library.vanderbilt.edu/act-imagelink.pl?RC=46042
(Use this link to refer back to this image.)

Copyright Permission:This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial ShareAlike 3.0 License. In short: you are free to use and to share the file for non-commercial purposes under the conditions that you appropriately attribute it, and that you distribute it only under a license compatible with this one. For uses other than the above, contact the Divinity Library at divref@vanderbilt.edu.
Attribution:Alpha and Omega, from Art in the Christian Tradition, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library, Nashville, TN. http://diglib.library.vanderbilt.edu/act-imagelink.pl?RC=46042 [retrieved September 25, 2016].
Record Number:46042 Last Updated: 2010-12-26 16:29:59 Record Created: 2006-06-14 00:00:00
Institution:Vanderbilt University Unit: Collection: Art in the Christian Tradition