Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.
 Venancio, Felipe

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Title:Father, into your hands I commend my spirit
Notes:

Even though the design is meant for the passion narrative in Luke, the design fits our text as well. Jesus is on cross, taking his last breath, and says his last words, “It is finished.” This last thought on Jesus lips is Jesus the man’s last act of obedience. This is Jesus acknowledging the end of his human life after he had redefined what it meant to be human. Even though the design is meant for the passion narrative in Luke, the design fits our text as well. Jesus is on cross, taking his last breath, and says his last words, “It is finished.” This last thought on Jesus lips is Jesus the man’s last act of obedience. This is Jesus acknowledging the end of his human life after he had redefined what it meant to be human.

In the design, it seems that in the full submission of Jesus’ spirit, the Father and the Holy Spirit are also present in taking the ghost from his body. There is full cooperation and teamwork in freeing the Word from Jesus’ body. The picture seems to take the scripture a step further in that the weight of the world’s sin also seems to be with the freeing of Jesus’ ghost. Perhaps this is when Jesus descends to the dead, and preaches to the souls being held captive. The stirring of the colors can symbolize not only breaking free, but also re-creation. Jesus is giving up the ghost but he is passing on the “new humanity.” Jesus willing became the sacrificial lamb so that humanity could have a chance to be reconstituted. Jesus humbled himself even unto death, so that we could be a new creation. Jesus committed his ghost so that humanity could be filled with the Holy Ghost. Jesus died so that we might live. Olusola Tribble In the design, it seems that in the full submission of Jesus’ spirit, the Father and the Holy Spirit are also present in taking the ghost from his body. There is full cooperation and teamwork in freeing the Word from Jesus’ body. The picture seems to take the scripture a step further in that the weight of the world’s sin also seems to be with the freeing of Jesus’ ghost. Perhaps this is when Jesus descends to the dead, and preaches to the souls being held captive.

The stirring of the colors can symbolize not only breaking free, but also re-creation. Jesus is giving up the ghost but he is passing on the “new humanity.” Jesus willing became the sacrificial lamb so that humanity could have a chance to be reconstituted. Jesus humbled himself even unto death, so that we could be a new creation. Jesus committed his ghost so that humanity could be filled with the Holy Ghost. Jesus died so that we might live. -- Olusola Tribble

Date:August 7, 2007
Artist:Venancio, Felipe
Object/Function:Photograph
City/Town:Sobradinho
Country:Brazil

Scripture:John 18:1-19:42
Lectionary links:BHoly05
General Subject:Holy Week

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Attribution:Venancio, Felipe. Father, into your hands I commend my spirit, from Art in the Christian Tradition, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library, Nashville, TN. http://diglib.library.vanderbilt.edu/act-imagelink.pl?RC=54141 [retrieved September 26, 2017]. Original source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/aeon/1039042091/.
Record Number:54141 Last Updated: 2010-10-23 14:28:15 Record Created: 2009-01-12 12:10:03
Institution:Vanderbilt University Unit: Collection: Art in the Christian Tradition